The Single Girl Dinner Detox Menu

I recently took a week to myself in L.A. to press the reset button on my diet. When I'm alone, I find that: (a) I don't feel as hungry, (b) I usually crave simple foods, and (c) my portion sizes are a lot smaller. 

It was time to get clean.

For inspiration, here's my detox menu:

 

STARTER: DAIKON & LEEK SOUP 

Daikon radish has many health benefits, including enzymes that aid in digesting fats and starches. This soup is soothing and light. I'd recommend adding an immersion blender to your arsenal of kitchen tools. It's absolutely indispensable! 


To make: Chop 1 leek and 1 large daikon radish. Heat a saucepan and add a slick of olive oil. Sauté the chopped leek and daikon radish until softened. Cover with water and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and cook until vegetables are tender. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Remove the saucepan from heat and use the immersion blender directly in the pot to blend the soup until smooth. Ladle into serving bowl. Sprinkle with freshly snipped chives. (I added black truffle zest for a touch of luxury!)

 

MAIN: SEARED SALMON IN COCONUT OIL 

As you probably already know, salmon is an excellent source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which lowers inflammation and helps the cells in your arteries function. Searing it in coconut oil adds a lovely coconutty flavor. In addition to converting "bad" LDL cholesterol into "good" HDL cholesterol, coconut oil is a powerful weapon at killing harmful stomach bacteria. 


To make: Season your salmon filet with salt and pepper. Melt a tablespoon of coconut oil in a hot skillet over high heat. Place the salmon in the skillet and, depending on its size, sear for 2 to 3 minutes on each side. Transfer the salmon to a plate and let it rest for a minute or two before serving. 

 

DESSERT: PAPAYA WITH BERRIES + SENCHA GREEN TEA

I love ending a meal with a small serving of fresh fruit and berries. Papaya contains enzymes that helps break down protein and reduces the amount of free radicals in your body that contribute to the development of cancer; blackberries and blueberries are excellent sources of antioxidants and have anti-inflammatory properties. Add a mug of hot sencha green tea on the side as a metabolism booster. 

Salmon & Shiitake Fried Rice

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You might not find salmon amongst popular forms of fried rice (chicken, pork, shrimp), but that doesn't mean you shouldn't give it a try. Usually, when I buy salmon, I'm on some sort of health kick and won't do much more than searing it in a pan with lemon juice and olive oil. This is certainly one way to give salmon a not-so-healthy but delicious "comfort food" makeover...


1 lb. of cooked salmon filet
1 container of shiitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
6 slices of fresh ginger, minced
6 cloves of garlic, chopped
1 bunch of scallions, chopped
2 eggs, beaten
1 bay leaf
3 or 4 cups of cooked rice
Soy sauce
Sesame oil
Vegetable oil
Salt and pepper

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1. Coat the surface of a large frying pan or wok and turn up to medium high heat. Add minced ginger and chopped garlic. Stir around with a wooden spatula until fragrant and golden. 

2. Add the cooked salmon filet and break into flakes with the wooden spatula. Mix well with garlic and ginger. 

3. Next, throw in the sliced shiitake mushrooms and drizzle with soy sauce. Stir around the pan with salmon until softened and cooked through. 

4. In a separate small frying pan, heat up vegetable oil and scramble up the two beaten eggs. Turn off heat and add the scrambled eggs to the mushrooms and salmon. 

5. At this point, start adding the cooked rice to the large frying pan in portions. Incorporate the rice with the mushrooms, salmon, and scrambled eggs. Crush the bay leaf and drop it into the mixture to add a nice aroma.

6. Drizzle the fried rice with soy sauce and continue to stir around the pan. I like it when there are crispy bits of rice. Add the scallions to the pan and fold into the fried rice. Season with salt and pepper.